Tag Archives: Memories

BCS Class of 1963 – a profile

Dear All,

The updated class which includes Ramesh Sinha and Randhir Sahgal.

We could not find the correct coat and tie but did the best that was possible. Yes, I notice the positioning of the necks but that is what was best for the moment but will change their clothes at the earliest when I can locate something more suitable !! However this now has pictures of the whole class for 1963. We miss those who are no longer with us:

Ashok Dina Nath
Harpreet Singh Grewal
Satjinder Singh Grewal
Usum Nimmanheminda
Arun Singh &
Rajive Sawhney

Can each of you write a few descriptive paragraphs about yourselves. Would make for interesting reading while there is an effort to assemble your latest pictures as well !!

Warmly

Vijay Khurana


You have missed me out. I am still alive. No big deal.
Regards
Rishi


Rishi

The omission was pure oversight. Apologies, and thankfully you are alive !! No class of 1963 is complete without its academic prima donna !!

Here is the complete list, see attachment, and the numbers allotted against each name is on the basis of the order in which we were standing when the group photograph was taken. The addition of Ramesh Sinha and Bittu Sahgal gives a total of 31 guys in VIth Form that year. Messrs Goldstein and Tuli are the addition 2 that takes the total in this group folder to 33

Warmly

Vijay


BCS Class of 1962 – a profile

I am forwarding the individual photographs for the Class of 1962 extracted from a group photograph taken in 1961. There is no official or formal picture for this group that should have been taken in 1962 as part of the usual year end photographic session. Some individual photographs have been extracted from other group pictures taken in 1962 e.g. Spartan Club members or the Prefects for 1962, for reasons of quality and clarity.

From among them the only person who is no longer with us is Shivraj Singh who died of an anaphylactic shock at a doctor’s clinic in 1963. No details are available. I recall him to be an intelligent person, good at hockey, had a decided stammer and a very even temper. He was in Lefroy House.

I do not have photographs for Vinod Chhabra, Himmat Singh and Simranjit Singh Mann who also joined this class in their final year. Those additions will be made as soon as we can lay our hands on appropriate photographs. Any assistance in that respect will be greatly appreciated from any one endorsed on this mailing list.

Usum who figures in this collection subsequently joined the Class of 1963. Dhishnu’s full and complete name is required / requested

Logically we should have such a profile for each year with a description about each one of them written after 25 and 50 years respectively. Would offer a great collection and this will ensure that each one is remembered. Great for posterity.

Warmly

Vijay Khurana


Dear All,

I have just received a prompt input from Sukanya, Usum’s wife. It is reproduced below:

“If I am not mistaken, Dhishnu supposed to be a guy from Thailand, right?
His name should be Tisanu Thien-ngern.  His father used to be Bangkok Governor for a long time.  Usum always met
him, a lanky and very funny guy.  I knew where he used to live but lost touch of him somewhat.
Sukanya”

That is our Dhishnu alright. I am attaching his photograph again so that Anil can make suitable changes.

This is actually a very useful input and have requested Sukanya to indicate further details about him, if available. It would be wonderful to meet with him again and Deepak Lamba as was the Curzon gang great friends with him.

Thanks, again, Sukanya

Warmly

Vijay


Sukanya is right, Tisanu Thien-ngern’s Dad was a long-time Gov of Bangkok. I remember that name from my time at the Bangkok Post newspaper.
What about the whereabouts of Prayudh, and the Assawamatiyanont brothers — Surachai and Surawat? Kirit Shah is still in Bangkok, last I heard of him.

Adisakdi Thaviyonchai also is doing well with his tractor business in Bangkok

Joe Joshi 1 (R 54 to 63)


Joe’s excellent inputs are appreciated with thanks

Adisak was few years junior to us and in Rivaz. I think SM and Vinod may know more about him

Cheers

Vijay


Many thanks for your prompt reply Vijay. I know Adisak’s home address in Rong Muang Soi 4 Bangkok, and his Thavorn Tractor business address. Kirit Shah used to live in Suriwongse Road, BKK. 
Joe


Good Reading: Bonnie BHASIN

“ Dad” Mahinder Nanda Esq; Global CEO of the Male Shaver’s PLATINUM Guild & SUDOKU Wizard..

As a young boy at BCS there lived amongst us thinnies’n skinnies a couple of hairy rascal gorillas in both the Rivaz & Lefroy Dorms… one I distinctly remember was a chap, short stocky compact with a loaded bristles-forever-face. The dude was sixteen but looked like yes, a mature gorilla with hairy arms that sort of nearly touched his ankles. If his hair wasn’t dark and jet black I could have sworn he was a Gorillorangutan, yes you too may have guessed, his parents “could” have been Gorilla and Orangutan one of each and “could” have met in the tropical jungles when hot-humid-pissing-down-in the rain forests, both seeking shelter from buckets of rain holding huge wild ferns over their heads, sitting next to each other staring ahead into the dark green sweltering heat with dragon flies a plenty…but as instincts call they both turned towards one another and Sweet Hallelujah it was LAFS; simplifying it-it was Love At First Sight, quite a scandal amongst the Gorilla and Orangutan tribes, but who gave a toss of banana scandals… and so the priest , another rascal of a Chimpanzee calling himself “ The Most Reverend ChiChoBonaparte” wed the 💏 couple in love ( thankfully the Orang was a Lady of the Highest Order and the Gorr a Gentleman who was a graduate from the esteemed HSBC, the Harvard School of Baboons & Connivers ( not the bloody bank).

Recollect readers the hairy Cottonian’s parents only-possibly, “could“ have been the two Apes…no?

The chap was a Rivazian and I looked at his face in awe; he was in Fifth Form and I in Upper One, so we were around ten years apart along with the fact his face, a layer of thick blue-green of bristles; we guys were silky smooth something like Cadbury’s chocolate.

Having the courage to ask him one day about his bristles and how they came about etcetra … he appeared smooth as silk too.. baffled! but still I ventured to ask nervously and he…“ I shave twice a day “ .. “Lola” replied with a confident smirk ‘n swagger and just jazzed off like a real star of the bristle brigade into the Tara Devi sunset ..yes Lola and another new fandangled word for him “Jhariaa” or thick bushes with bramble that butterflies-afraid-to perch on was his second nick name.

Many of us wondered what that word “ shave” was all about…

Of course I tried to ask many in Lefroy, even the surdies who boasted Rapunzel hair under their turbans; none had the foggiest about bristles’ n beards and how “Lola the Jhariaa” was ahead of the hairy curve.

Lola passed out from BCS and except for a scant one or two strands emanating from some other dude’s follicles I never encountered another Gollirorangutan passed my ten years in School.

Another year and two passed.. I was going to join the band of gypsies as The Merchant Marine called.. By now a few strands had emerged in my regale chin too and I was told by the Company Superintendent “ report on board with your packed kit bag; a shave every day with a decent hair cut”. ….

The first ablution! Shave! And still I was lost. My Father was away to Sandheads so Mum said she would book a trunk call to Bombay and I “ should speak to Mahinderji who will be able to explain slowly carefully and simply how you should shave 🪒 “
I remember trunk calls during the early 1970’s were a Big Deal; with water and sewage in the trunk line it was required to shout loud and hard as there were 2000 kms between Calcutta and Bombay..as it was important that your neighbours heard you, so impressed by the howls and screams after all this was a Trunk Call not a telegram..

The trunk call was all I needed..

to understand the beard to be weeded

Mahenderji, a real shaving ace

Asked me to feel the contours of my face

Mine was smooth rough low high beard

Don’t fret it will feel initially weird

Now wash your face with hot water

A nice badger brush to build up lather

those days the cream he used was Old Spice

Impressed me do not roll the dice

stick to that cream good advise from the wise

Now a safety razor with seven’o’clock

that I applied, nicked and in shock

Follow the lines of your chiseled face

Long confident strokes you will make

Like the smooth Kalka Simla train

Beware never ever against the grain…

and so my story goes, it was Thanks to Dad Mahenderji I learnt the art of shaving. He was a little skeptic on showing me tricks on designing my moustache since he had a gallant sophisticated bigote and I wasn’t allowed to sport one.
Whenever my ship docked after transatlantic voyages at Bombay, I bounded across to Silver Oaks to meet the Global CEO of The Male Shaver’s PLATINUM guild who studied the fine contours of my face; we heaped praises and plati-accolades on each other’s fine performances most he-to-me in his humble way; I always took copious notes but I knew then I still hadn’t achieved the ski lines or the glowing freshness of DAD’s and had much to learn, to complete many badger-creme-razor voyages before I could shave on a dark night with only lightning striking the palms above in a pouring rainforest…. as a Gorilla and Orangutan madly in love holding hands sat watching me…

.. till date the shaving lectures I received have being ingrained in my memory…….perhaps it was the deafening rock concerts I went to, the roll, pitch and pounding of my ship catching me off balance that I shaved my tuft against the grain too often and Alas! My Beard is amongst the damnedest sharpest roughest the world has ever seen or anyone has felt ( wink ! wink!)

But I remain ever grateful to “ DAD” who continued to impress the Yanks with his mathematical wizardry; fifty years ago whilst visiting Japan Dad met Emperor Shōwa Hirohito who asked him “besides Honda Toyota Kawasaki and Seiko what else could the Imperial Rising Sun give to the world”?

Dad whilst enjoying a plate of salmon sushi and saki smiled and bowing to His Royal Highness … whispering questioning “Royal Highness .SODOKU.?”

Confused HRH Shōwa with a high brow responded …”Please expand Nanda San ….”
… and Dad replied.smiling again …
“ Your Royal Highness…Suji wa dokushin ni kagiru “

And that’s when it all started …
First THE ART OF SHAVING &
Later SUDOKU WIZARDRY

🙏❤️🙏Dad!
Wizard of Many
Dragon Slayer of Sudoku …..from Easy to Evil.
Global CEO of The Male Shaver’s Platinum Guild

Bonnie ( Vivek )Bhasin
Lefroy 1961-1970
Still Shaving .. imperfectly
Still referring to copious notes..

(Also in memory of Lola the Jhariaa Sharma .. wherever your growth has taken you..Bro 🙏)

08 Aug 2021

Mr. Mustaq Masih – passed away in 2020 – we just got to know.

Received from Vijay [Kuttu] Singh who received this news from Manjit Sehmbey:

Article quoted from this link online:
It is with great sadness and heavy hearts the family of Mushtaq Masih lost their patriarch on Sunday, October 18, 2020 at 8:59am. Mushtaq Masih was born in Northern India in 1935. He received his Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Physical Education from Batala Bearing Christian College and University of Gwalior. In India he was known as a competitive athlete and excelled at sports like sprinting, field hockey, and boxing. Mushtaq’s talent allowed him to represent India on several national athletic teams. He was best known as a member of India’s 3 fastest men- The Three Flying M’s (Milkha, Makhan, and Mushtaq) and his record-breaking time in the 100-meter dash. As a nationally celebrated athlete, winning dozens of awards across India, Mushtaq continues to hold records for his success in track and field. He went on to serve as a director of sports for the states of Punjab and Haryana.

Mushtaq arrived in Canada and settled in P.E.I. in 1966 with his young family. He was an educator in phys-ed and mathematics, and went on to serve as the director of physical education for P.E.I, and was a known champion for women’s field hockey across the country. Mushtaq was also the founder president of the P.E.I. Amateur Boxing Association and inducted into the Canadian Boxing Hall of Fame in 1973. The same year Mushtaq and his wife were guests at the Opening Centennial Summer Games, where Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip famously and publicly greeted the only East Indian couple in attendance. Mushtaq’s passion for sports led him to become a pioneer for sporting equipment, and a titan in importing and exporting sporting goods across Canada. Mushtaq went on to become a national sponsor and delegate for the Canadian Olympic Team from 1972-1984.

Mushtaq was also widely recognized as a pillar of the East Indian community, sponsoring and helping to immigrate more than 20 East Indian families to the Maritimes. In the mid-eighties Mushtaq relocated to the Niagara region and continued his entrepreneurial journey, owning and operating Niagara’s first East Indian restaurant; stemming from his desire to continue to serve his East Indian Community and integrate its culture into the Canadian mosaic for all to enjoy. Throughout his life he had a passion for travel and accomplished his goal of traveling the world aboard PANAM in 40 days, touching his feet in every ocean. Mushtaq often gave back his time and donated to charitable organizations both in Canada and India.

Mushtaq lived a passionate life of gratitude, joy, service and love. He passed peacefully with his wife and eldest granddaughter by his side. He will be lovingly remembered by his wife Zohara Masih and children Rita Chahal (Chander), Renu D’Cunha (Pascal), Varinder Masih (Sunita), and Vijay Masih (Preetshika). Mushtaq will also be fondly remembered by his 9 grandchildren Crystal D’Cunha, Ravi Chahal (Jiwan), Asha Bhanot (Sonny), Rachel D’Cunha, Joshua D’Cunha, Anjali Chahal, Zeena Masih, Sheena Masih, and Amora Singmasi; and 5 great-grandchildren Zorique Olayori, Tejas Chahal, Naveen Bhanot, Maeva Chahal, and Neela Bhanot.

ROBIN NAKAI [Rivaz 1963-69] writes
Memories of a School Boy . When I joined Bishop Cotton School in Shimla , I little realised that I would be meeting and rubbing shoulders , though I was far to short to rub shoulders , with existing legends and those who would go down in to the annals of time , as legendary figures . Games were an integral part of the school curriculum and it was totally compulsory to be on the playing fields in your games kit , every evening and participating in the game of the season – as games were played in pre set and planned fixtures in the year , and divided into compartments , keeping the weather seasons in view , as football was a rainy season fixture . It was first in class that I was to meet Mr. Mushtaq Masih , and there is no recollection in my mind of the subject which he taught and of which class he was then the class teacher off – I think it was Lower 2 or maybe Upper 2 — I do recall , one year , that Krishna Rana ( Tiger ) and I went one day after the final exams , to Mr . Mushtaq Masih’s house , to ask him to give Tiger Rana some grace marks , in maths I think , so that Tiger would not fail the finals , and thus not be allowed to come back to School in March for the next session . Tiger being a fabulous natural born sportsman was a favourite of Mr . Masih , and I recall standing down in Remove Dormitory , out side Sir’s house and hearing Sir laugh and say – Don’t worry Tiger , go enjoy Kathmandu and your holidays , and you will come back next year ‘ Tiger got his grace marks — and came back to school next year —that was the magnanimity of Mr . Musthtaq Masih . My encounters with him were to happen on the hockey field , and it was from this legend – of whose glory we school boys were totally unaware – that I was to learn the art of dribble , trap , scoop , backhand pass whilst at a full run , snap the ball between the defenders legs to the team mate behind , and if one was lucky – to sound the boards , to the roars of cheers from the stadium . Boxing would come and Mr . Mushtaq Masih would be there in his white flannels and with his whistle shinning in the sunlight around his neck – his signature dress code , guiding , coaching the art of block , jab , hook , upper cut , head down defence and the foot work required for being a good boxer . Sir , would be on the second flat every athletic season , teaching the art or gliding over a hurdle with the body bent low and the take of leg skimming the top of the bar , he would be there teaching the art of the take off from the starters gun , the slick magic of the baton exchange which was so critical to the winning of the relay – was an art that was to be perfected . He was there for it all , and I can remember those days , so clearly . Then , one day Mr . Mushtaq Masih announced that he was migrating to the young country – Canada . It was a sad sorrow – the parting – as he was a well liked man , as was his wife Zohara . News would filter about down over the years about his life and we were told that he had started Women’s Hocky in Canada , and had then a big name in the Canada in the games arena , and so on and so forth . Time passed on , as it inevitably does , and we lost track of Sir – till today when Manjit Sehmbey – a sprinter from my batch of 1969 and also my School Captain , sent an article to Kuttu Singh , for the school magazine – The Patina Times . It seems that Mr . Mushtaq Masih ran his last race in 2020 , when he passed peacefully to the great halls of Valhalla . What makes the design of the story so poignant today is that today we have all received the sad news as regards the passing , of the Flying Sikh Milkha Singh . It is sad to know that he was one of the ‘Ms’ of the Three Flying Ms of Punjab – Milkha – Mushtaq – Makhan . One wonders where the Third M ( Makhan ) is today . So today as Milkha and Mushtaq stand at the starters gun in Elysium , there must must be a hush of anticipation as the crowd waits with a bated breath for an epic race to start . Rest in Peace Sir , and know that the mark you left of your coaching us , paid us good heed in our years of growing up in the Bishop Cotton School , Shimla . I participated in all hockey fixtures and also won the medal for the Best Loser in Boxing . My name , in Gold Leaf is on the honours board in Bishop Cotton . The names of all my team mates and of all those other teams who were coached by you , are a testimony to your untiring patience and guidance . It’s is there sir , for you were our coach . I shall , along with all the other players and athletes shall cherish that memory , eternally .

Vijay Khurana writes:

It is with great sadness we just learnt of the passing away of Mr Mushtaq Masih. He passed away last year. Our deepest sympathies and condolences to his wife and their family members.

Mr Masih joined BCS in 1958. I think he was one of those teachers, like Mr Roshan Lal, who came to Simla from Palampur with Rev Dustan when he joined the School as Headmaster.

Until Mr Masih’s induction into the School’s staff, BCS never had a sports coach. Just prior to his entry the School had employed Mr Kumar, ex- Indian Navyas a PT instructor but he did not remain long. Mr Masih was the first sporting coach at BCS. Until his entry there was no coach for athletics with most of the training being conducted by teachers who had an affinity for a particular sport e.g. Mr J D Williams (Soccer), Mr E A Cuzen (Cricket) or the famous Mr V E O Carville (Boxing), formerly with the Burma police. Mr Masih made a difference to the track and field events, especially the short distance sprints. Standards improved and as Inderjit Singh “Badal” (Lefroy 1951-63) testifies on the obituary page for Mr Masih:

“Badal Singh 338
Sincere condolences to the entire family ,
Mr Masih was my Athletics coach at Bishop Cotton School Simla” in 1962/63 And helped me improve my 100 yard dash and to break the school record ….. I will always remember and be grateful to him 🙏”

BCS also began to fare well at the Inter- public school meets at Patiala which for the most part was usually dominated by YPS, Patiala. We attributed that dominance to their significantly older ages than the acceptable average for boys in school.!! However, in later years with somewhat more professional training inputs by Mr Masih the results began to be visible. His impact was greatest with those who ran the short distance but the long and medium distance runner seemed to gain little. Some of them still remember, with a degree of remorse, their potential never being fully exploited. Mr Masih was no task master and his approach, in his inimitable rustic style, was always persuasive. He gave you the direction but the incentive and urge to win had to be yours. His influence was visible and some of his methods probably endured after he left BCS in 1966 or thereabouts.

Mr Masih during our time also coached the soccer and hockey teams as Govinder Singh (Ibbetson 1953-3) recalls:

” Mr Masih was a very helpful and friendly person to all athletes. That’s how I remember him. He spent one entire afternoon teaching me to improve my goalkeeping for the upcoming Sanawar match.
The obituary does not mention BCS.
I’m sure we all wish him well in the hereafter, and his family in Canada”

Mr & Mrs Masih retained their connections with BCS and Simla and would visit whenever they were in India having emigrated to Canada. His connections with BCS endured and I notice his wife and he were guests of honour at an OC lunch in Ontario in 2005. (http://www.oldcottonians.org/canada_31905.htm)

Looking back, Canada attracted a whole load of talented men and women from BCS – Mr Sasim Das Gupta, Mr Mathew Zachariah, Mr & Mrs Goss, Mr & Mrs Mal, Mr Ramesh Tiwari ,&  Mr & Mrs Masih. Rev & Mrs Dustan simply went home. They were Canadian citizens !! They all contributed in a significant way to that country with some of them holding positions of great scholarship and eminence. In the process, all of them without exception, created wonderful and financially rewarding lives.

Mr Masih went a bit further than sports education to become an entrepreneur in the restaurant business. That was a trait he never exhibited but shows how remarkably well talent blossoms given the opportunity. Rest in Peace, Mr Masih and thank you for all that you did for us !!

Video by the talented Badal Singh [Inderjit Singh Badal / Lefroy 1951-63]

Badal Singh circulates his very special collection of photos in a very special way. Here is one, which we are sure many many OCs will enjoy very much!

It would be great to have as many old photos from your BCS days as well as any new photos of yourselves / family / old school friends and captioned with the dates and people who appear in these.

Memories are made of the good days and good times spent with friends and loved ones so lets share the love!