Tag Archives: BCS Teacher

Mr. Mustaq Masih – passed away in 2020 – we just got to know.

Received from Vijay [Kuttu] Singh who received this news from Manjit Sehmbey:

Article quoted from this link online:
It is with great sadness and heavy hearts the family of Mushtaq Masih lost their patriarch on Sunday, October 18, 2020 at 8:59am. Mushtaq Masih was born in Northern India in 1935. He received his Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Physical Education from Batala Bearing Christian College and University of Gwalior. In India he was known as a competitive athlete and excelled at sports like sprinting, field hockey, and boxing. Mushtaq’s talent allowed him to represent India on several national athletic teams. He was best known as a member of India’s 3 fastest men- The Three Flying M’s (Milkha, Makhan, and Mushtaq) and his record-breaking time in the 100-meter dash. As a nationally celebrated athlete, winning dozens of awards across India, Mushtaq continues to hold records for his success in track and field. He went on to serve as a director of sports for the states of Punjab and Haryana.

Mushtaq arrived in Canada and settled in P.E.I. in 1966 with his young family. He was an educator in phys-ed and mathematics, and went on to serve as the director of physical education for P.E.I, and was a known champion for women’s field hockey across the country. Mushtaq was also the founder president of the P.E.I. Amateur Boxing Association and inducted into the Canadian Boxing Hall of Fame in 1973. The same year Mushtaq and his wife were guests at the Opening Centennial Summer Games, where Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip famously and publicly greeted the only East Indian couple in attendance. Mushtaq’s passion for sports led him to become a pioneer for sporting equipment, and a titan in importing and exporting sporting goods across Canada. Mushtaq went on to become a national sponsor and delegate for the Canadian Olympic Team from 1972-1984.

Mushtaq was also widely recognized as a pillar of the East Indian community, sponsoring and helping to immigrate more than 20 East Indian families to the Maritimes. In the mid-eighties Mushtaq relocated to the Niagara region and continued his entrepreneurial journey, owning and operating Niagara’s first East Indian restaurant; stemming from his desire to continue to serve his East Indian Community and integrate its culture into the Canadian mosaic for all to enjoy. Throughout his life he had a passion for travel and accomplished his goal of traveling the world aboard PANAM in 40 days, touching his feet in every ocean. Mushtaq often gave back his time and donated to charitable organizations both in Canada and India.

Mushtaq lived a passionate life of gratitude, joy, service and love. He passed peacefully with his wife and eldest granddaughter by his side. He will be lovingly remembered by his wife Zohara Masih and children Rita Chahal (Chander), Renu D’Cunha (Pascal), Varinder Masih (Sunita), and Vijay Masih (Preetshika). Mushtaq will also be fondly remembered by his 9 grandchildren Crystal D’Cunha, Ravi Chahal (Jiwan), Asha Bhanot (Sonny), Rachel D’Cunha, Joshua D’Cunha, Anjali Chahal, Zeena Masih, Sheena Masih, and Amora Singmasi; and 5 great-grandchildren Zorique Olayori, Tejas Chahal, Naveen Bhanot, Maeva Chahal, and Neela Bhanot.

ROBIN NAKAI [Rivaz 1963-69] writes
Memories of a School Boy . When I joined Bishop Cotton School in Shimla , I little realised that I would be meeting and rubbing shoulders , though I was far to short to rub shoulders , with existing legends and those who would go down in to the annals of time , as legendary figures . Games were an integral part of the school curriculum and it was totally compulsory to be on the playing fields in your games kit , every evening and participating in the game of the season – as games were played in pre set and planned fixtures in the year , and divided into compartments , keeping the weather seasons in view , as football was a rainy season fixture . It was first in class that I was to meet Mr. Mushtaq Masih , and there is no recollection in my mind of the subject which he taught and of which class he was then the class teacher off – I think it was Lower 2 or maybe Upper 2 — I do recall , one year , that Krishna Rana ( Tiger ) and I went one day after the final exams , to Mr . Mushtaq Masih’s house , to ask him to give Tiger Rana some grace marks , in maths I think , so that Tiger would not fail the finals , and thus not be allowed to come back to School in March for the next session . Tiger being a fabulous natural born sportsman was a favourite of Mr . Masih , and I recall standing down in Remove Dormitory , out side Sir’s house and hearing Sir laugh and say – Don’t worry Tiger , go enjoy Kathmandu and your holidays , and you will come back next year ‘ Tiger got his grace marks — and came back to school next year —that was the magnanimity of Mr . Musthtaq Masih . My encounters with him were to happen on the hockey field , and it was from this legend – of whose glory we school boys were totally unaware – that I was to learn the art of dribble , trap , scoop , backhand pass whilst at a full run , snap the ball between the defenders legs to the team mate behind , and if one was lucky – to sound the boards , to the roars of cheers from the stadium . Boxing would come and Mr . Mushtaq Masih would be there in his white flannels and with his whistle shinning in the sunlight around his neck – his signature dress code , guiding , coaching the art of block , jab , hook , upper cut , head down defence and the foot work required for being a good boxer . Sir , would be on the second flat every athletic season , teaching the art or gliding over a hurdle with the body bent low and the take of leg skimming the top of the bar , he would be there teaching the art of the take off from the starters gun , the slick magic of the baton exchange which was so critical to the winning of the relay – was an art that was to be perfected . He was there for it all , and I can remember those days , so clearly . Then , one day Mr . Mushtaq Masih announced that he was migrating to the young country – Canada . It was a sad sorrow – the parting – as he was a well liked man , as was his wife Zohara . News would filter about down over the years about his life and we were told that he had started Women’s Hocky in Canada , and had then a big name in the Canada in the games arena , and so on and so forth . Time passed on , as it inevitably does , and we lost track of Sir – till today when Manjit Sehmbey – a sprinter from my batch of 1969 and also my School Captain , sent an article to Kuttu Singh , for the school magazine – The Patina Times . It seems that Mr . Mushtaq Masih ran his last race in 2020 , when he passed peacefully to the great halls of Valhalla . What makes the design of the story so poignant today is that today we have all received the sad news as regards the passing , of the Flying Sikh Milkha Singh . It is sad to know that he was one of the ‘Ms’ of the Three Flying Ms of Punjab – Milkha – Mushtaq – Makhan . One wonders where the Third M ( Makhan ) is today . So today as Milkha and Mushtaq stand at the starters gun in Elysium , there must must be a hush of anticipation as the crowd waits with a bated breath for an epic race to start . Rest in Peace Sir , and know that the mark you left of your coaching us , paid us good heed in our years of growing up in the Bishop Cotton School , Shimla . I participated in all hockey fixtures and also won the medal for the Best Loser in Boxing . My name , in Gold Leaf is on the honours board in Bishop Cotton . The names of all my team mates and of all those other teams who were coached by you , are a testimony to your untiring patience and guidance . It’s is there sir , for you were our coach . I shall , along with all the other players and athletes shall cherish that memory , eternally .

Vijay Khurana writes:

It is with great sadness we just learnt of the passing away of Mr Mushtaq Masih. He passed away last year. Our deepest sympathies and condolences to his wife and their family members.

Mr Masih joined BCS in 1958. I think he was one of those teachers, like Mr Roshan Lal, who came to Simla from Palampur with Rev Dustan when he joined the School as Headmaster.

Until Mr Masih’s induction into the School’s staff, BCS never had a sports coach. Just prior to his entry the School had employed Mr Kumar, ex- Indian Navyas a PT instructor but he did not remain long. Mr Masih was the first sporting coach at BCS. Until his entry there was no coach for athletics with most of the training being conducted by teachers who had an affinity for a particular sport e.g. Mr J D Williams (Soccer), Mr E A Cuzen (Cricket) or the famous Mr V E O Carville (Boxing), formerly with the Burma police. Mr Masih made a difference to the track and field events, especially the short distance sprints. Standards improved and as Inderjit Singh “Badal” (Lefroy 1951-63) testifies on the obituary page for Mr Masih:

“Badal Singh 338
Sincere condolences to the entire family ,
Mr Masih was my Athletics coach at Bishop Cotton School Simla” in 1962/63 And helped me improve my 100 yard dash and to break the school record ….. I will always remember and be grateful to him 🙏”

BCS also began to fare well at the Inter- public school meets at Patiala which for the most part was usually dominated by YPS, Patiala. We attributed that dominance to their significantly older ages than the acceptable average for boys in school.!! However, in later years with somewhat more professional training inputs by Mr Masih the results began to be visible. His impact was greatest with those who ran the short distance but the long and medium distance runner seemed to gain little. Some of them still remember, with a degree of remorse, their potential never being fully exploited. Mr Masih was no task master and his approach, in his inimitable rustic style, was always persuasive. He gave you the direction but the incentive and urge to win had to be yours. His influence was visible and some of his methods probably endured after he left BCS in 1966 or thereabouts.

Mr Masih during our time also coached the soccer and hockey teams as Govinder Singh (Ibbetson 1953-3) recalls:

” Mr Masih was a very helpful and friendly person to all athletes. That’s how I remember him. He spent one entire afternoon teaching me to improve my goalkeeping for the upcoming Sanawar match.
The obituary does not mention BCS.
I’m sure we all wish him well in the hereafter, and his family in Canada”

Mr & Mrs Masih retained their connections with BCS and Simla and would visit whenever they were in India having emigrated to Canada. His connections with BCS endured and I notice his wife and he were guests of honour at an OC lunch in Ontario in 2005. (http://www.oldcottonians.org/canada_31905.htm)

Looking back, Canada attracted a whole load of talented men and women from BCS – Mr Sasim Das Gupta, Mr Mathew Zachariah, Mr & Mrs Goss, Mr & Mrs Mal, Mr Ramesh Tiwari ,&  Mr & Mrs Masih. Rev & Mrs Dustan simply went home. They were Canadian citizens !! They all contributed in a significant way to that country with some of them holding positions of great scholarship and eminence. In the process, all of them without exception, created wonderful and financially rewarding lives.

Mr Masih went a bit further than sports education to become an entrepreneur in the restaurant business. That was a trait he never exhibited but shows how remarkably well talent blossoms given the opportunity. Rest in Peace, Mr Masih and thank you for all that you did for us !!

Vote of Thanks

Never in recent times has the OCA mounted such a large effort for a cause. What was most heartening was the spontaneity, the huge response with over a 120 OCs coming forward, and over a 150 of them eagerly waiting to jump in to help when needed, the earnest sense of belonging and for a cause that was close to our hearts. The OCs responding to our call were from a vast number of batches the from 1991 to 2006 and beyond, demonstrating the depth of commitment in the Association. Truly outstanding!

It was a last ditch effort to save one of our dearly loved teachers. A teacher means everything in our Guru/Shishya system. We view them with reverence and respect. They represent God’s image on earth as the dictum that drives so many of us in our affection for them. They taught us our first lessons and they instilled in us a value system that we carry with us till the end of our days. Thank you, Mrs Kamini Mustafi

The endeavour was not lacking in either commitment nor effort, financial or otherwise. The odds were stacked heavily against us. Nevertheless, we will never fail and if Mrs Mustafi is no longer with us her spiritual energy and her loving memory drives us to never forget that we will always overcome adversities when they stare us in the face.” To strive, to seek, to find and not to yield”

At a personal level, Kanav Monga and I express our gratitude to acknowledge all those from this fraternity of Old Cottonians and Teachers who responded to our call for help. We came together for the Mustafi Family to lend a helping hand and in our prayers. I am truly inspired and heartened by the solidarity of our fraternity.Given below is the list of names of boys who responded to our call.

We progressed through the month, praying and clinging to even the most fragile string of hope. Our hands were folded in prayer. We held our hands together with more hands joining in everyday, until the end. Those beautiful words just kept ringing in my ears……”As true as is a brother’s love, as close as ivy grows, we’ll stand foursquare throughout our lives to every wind that blows….”

There is always more to learn from a loss than there is in victory. Victory is but a fleeting moment, it is the losses that last and build us for whats to come next.

This effort reminded us what we knew, that we are there for each other. We must always continue to keep this torch alight for others to find us wherever they may need help.

Strength lies in numbers they say, and so,

I graciously acknowledge the support of the students from St Paul’s, Darjeeling. They have our thanks. and we found another family in the Paulites all united by the Mustafi Family. I say let it amount to something.

Ever onwards.

Thank you, again, individually and collectively.

Warmly

Chezard Bin Abid
Ibbetson

Formerly, Shahzad Hussain

(1987 – 1993 )

AND

Kanav Monga
Ibbetson

(1986 – 1998)

Sl.No Name Batch Amount Bank Status
1 Kanav Monga 1998 50000 SCB Paid
2 Anuj Sood – 1998 50000 SCB Paid
3 Arun Martin Chauhan 1998 20000 Paid
4 Vijay khurana 1963 20000 Paid
5 Narinder Yadav 25000 SCB Paid
6 Ashwani Singh Virk 15000 Axis Bank Paid
7 Navid Tariq 20000 SCB Paid
8
9 Ab Gaur 1993 100000 Paid
10 Amaninder Singh Walia 10000 SCB Paid
11 Vikrant Suri 1997 100000 Paid
12
13 Mehtab Wadala 1998 25000 Axis Bank Paid
14 Bharat Dua 1993 20000 Paid
15 Harman Bedi 1998 10000 SCB Paid
16 Gaurav Jindal 1998 20000 SCB Paid
17 Bikram Shapuri 1998 50000 SCB Paid
18 Bikram Grewal 10000 SCB Paid
19 Saurabh Khanna 1998 10000 SCB Paid
20
21 Ajaipal 1998 15000 SCBL Paid
22 Lakshman Anand 15000 Axis Bank Paid
23

Batch of 2001

74000 Paid
1. Abhay  Thakur
2. Abhishek sood
3. Aditya Rana
4. Akshay khanna
5. S Amandeep Singh Sidhu
6. Amit Mehta (c)
7. Ankit Singh
8. Ashish Jajodia
9. Bharat Bhushan
10. Bunkim Chadda
11. Christopher Sunny Kumar
12. Dhruv Nangia
13. Gursimran Brar
14. Himaka Serna
15. lnderpal Chatha
16. Jasdeep Goraya
17. Karan Ahuja
18. Karan Karol
19. Karanbir Singh Gulati
20. Ketan Mahajan
21. Kshitij Sharma
22. Laxman Anand
23. Mohnish Kapoor
24. Mohsin Sachdeva
25. Nishant Bansal
26. Nitin Chauhan
27. Piyush Mehta
28. Pulkit Dogar
29. Rohit Saharan
30. Sahil Bhasin
31. Saurabh Malohtra
32. Shahab Ahmed
33. Tirath Singh Garewal
34 . Varun Chauhan
35. Vibhor Gandotra
36.  Vinayak Singh
37.  Karanvir Singh Gill]
24 Amit Singhal 20000 Paid
25 Shubham Anand 1995 30000 SCB Paid
26 Dushyant Talwar 1998 10000 Axis Bank Paid
27 Akash seth 20000 SCB Paid
28 Royce Kukreja 25000 SCB Paid
29
30 Irfan Ansari 1995 100000 Axis Paid
31 Abhishek Kakar (Behl) 1998 20000 SCB Paid
32 Sindhwani’s 25000 SCB Paid
33
34
35
36
37 Jasbir singh rai 1998 20000 SCB Paid
38

Batch of 2002

390000 SCB Paid
1. A bhinav Aggarwal
2. Ajay Bodh
3. Amaninder Singh Walia
4. Anupam Verma
5. Arjun Sodhi
6. Ashish Mahajan
7. Atul Goyal
8. Chemit Yurgal
9. Gurusagar Nagai
10. Harpreet Singh
11. Ishaan Bhatia
12. Jaideep Sandhu
13. Karan Singh  Pandher
14. Karan Thakur
15. Krystan De’cuna
16. Kunal Modgil
17. Murtuza Hyder Ali Khan
18. Narayan Krishan
19. Nitin Singh Thakur
20. Piyush Narani
21. Puneet Banga
22. Puneet Pal Sachdeva
23. Rahul Kalia
24. Rajat Gupta
25. Rajeshwar Singh Mangat
26. Rishi Mahajan
27. Rohit Chauhan
28. Sahil Chopra
29. Saurabh Shukla
30. Shobit Sareen
31. Siddharth Chauhan
32. Siddharth Kumar
33. Sidharth Jaitwani
34. Sunil Tiwari
35. Vikram Singh  Negi
36. Vivek Sharma
39 Samar Arora ( daffodil) 10000 Paid
40 Suneet Goyal 15000 Paid
41
42
43
44
45 Sachin Mahajan 1995 50000 Paid
46
47 25000
48 25000
49
50 Manpreet Manhas 1998 25000 SCB Paid
51 Dhiraj Berry 10000 SCB Paid
52 Manish Aggarwal 1992 50000 SCB Paid
53 Ramandeep Anand 1992 50000 SCB Paid
54 Zailinder Singh Shoor 2004 10000 SCB Paid
55 Rachit Aggarwal 2004 25000 SCB Paid
56 Gaurav Gombar 1993 20000 SCB Paid
57
58
59 Rohit Berry 1995 10000 SCB Paid
60
61 John Khiangte 1998 10000 SCB Paid
62

Batch of 2006

75,234 SCB Paid
      1.Tsewang Topgyal
      2. Suraj Tayal
      3. Vishal Menon
      4. Siddhant Singh Bedi
      5. Anuraj Singh Mangat
      6. Rajat Prabhakar
      7. Prashant Dogra
      8. Manvir Singh Nahal
      9. Prithviraj Thakur
    10. Hitesh Chauhan
    11. Toito Sema
    12. Karan Malhotra
    13. Sagat Singh Sandhu
    14. Navraj Singh Dhillon
    15. Shaninder Singh Sandhu
63 Prannoy Dey 2005 10000 SCB Paid

EDITOR:
That is a total of INR 17,39,234 [Seventeen Lakhs Thirty Nine Thousand Two Hundred Thirty Four [or US$24,000].

Saddened to inform: Mrs Kamini Mustafi passed away

It is with deepest sorrow I inform you that Mrs Kamini Mustafi passed away this morning at 8:48 am after having fought for a month.

Above is the message as received from Mr. Kabir Mustafi.
[10:23 AM, 6/4/2021] Vijay Khurana: Deepest sympathies and our condolences. We felt and had all hopes that we would win this battle. I am sorry we lost but you did not give up without a sterling and committed effort.
Our hearts go out to you, Adhiraj, Ishita and the members of your family. We share your loss and the pain is hard when life fades away from the ones you hold most precious.
Good bye, Kamini, you memories will live in our hearts. We thank you for touching so many lives and guiding so many of us. You left a mark and were an example to so many of your students. They were all your children. Thank you.
May He hold Kamini in His arms and may He give you courage to bear this loss.
Warmly
Cherzad, Kanav & Vijay

An absolute pillar of Bishop Cotton School : John William Winston Whitmarsh-Knight

A wonderful obituary to John Whitmarsh Knight who I still feel floating in all our midst…
On His teaching assignment at BCS Simla he described this..”as the happiest and most fulfilling period of his life …”
Although it has been18 months since John wandered in to his special garden, his presence on our website will give great strength to each and every Cottonian.
Thanks very much.
My Warmest…
Vivek
Whitmarsh-Knight, John William Winston (OA 1952-60)

22/08/1941 –  09/11/2018

John Whitmarsh‐Knight was born in Karachi into a military family before partition and moved to England when he was aged 7.  The family home was at Grove Park and John came to Dulwich from a local primary school.  At Dulwich he excelled at sport.  He was in the 1st XV for three years (58 – 60), being Captain in his last year, and in the 1st V11‐a‐side rugby team from 1957.   He was a 1st X1 cricketer for two years (59 – 60) and in the hockey 1st X1 for three seasons.   John was editor of the Alleynian and a member of many societies.  He became a prefect in 1959 and Captain of the School the following year.  During his last year, when in the Geography Upper Sixth, he took the scholarship exams at Cambridge and on the back of these was offered a place at Fitzwilliam College.

John was an all‐rounder in every sense of the word.  At this early stage he already showed a deep love for literature; he was greatly admired and respected not only for his academic and sporting prowess, but also for his exceptionally warm, caring and thoughtful personality.  He was known for his generosity, his kindness and willingness to help others, and also for his exuberant sense of humour and fun.  With these endearing qualities, coupled with his natural modesty and prodigious memory, he made many friends both at school and throughout the rest of his life.

On leaving Dulwich he decided against going to university and instead worked in the City.  However, he soon became disenchanted with finance and in 1964 left for Africa where he worked in Nigeria, Sierra Leone and then the Seychelles, being involved in international companies and latterly a government department.  During this time he experienced a dozen coups d’etat, his recipe for survival being to fill the bath with water, buy quantities of food to last three months, board up windows and wait for events to calm down.

After 10 years John returned to the UK and took up a senior position in a Company owned by an OA friend, Paul Fessler.  He successfully developed amongst other products a range of organic cosmetics to rival Body Shop.  Each year during this period John became involved with the All England Lawn Tennis Club as a volunteer at the famous Wimbledon championships.  He gained a reputation for introducing a much improved method for crowd entry, and the other senior stewards were also aware that when John was on duty his engaging personality ensured the crowd would be in good humour.

John though became academically restless and studied for an English degree at Birkbeck University.  This he put to good effect and in 2009 he returned to his native India to become a very successful teacher at the Bishop Cotton School in Shimla; this is a boarding school in the Himalayan foothills and is a replica of an English public school.   John described this as the happiest and most fulfilling period of his life.  Regrettably, ill health due to chronic lung disease forced him to leave prematurely in 2012.  He is remembered there as “a gentleman and scholar who worked tirelessly and was an absolute pillar of the Bishop Cotton School”.

A series of three documentary films entitled “Indian Hill Railways” was made for British television in 2010 and the third of these featured the Kalka – Shimla railway, which was built by the British and opened in 1903. The film director obviously recognised John’s charisma and showed him on a number of occasions, both traveling back to the school post holiday and also at the school itself.  In the film John explained that previously he had worked in business which was a “take‐take situation, now [at the school] it is a give‐give situation, very refreshing.” This was a typical reaction from John.

Back in England John’s lung condition continued to deteriorate and he became less able to leave his home in Addlestone, Surrey.   He spent much of his time delving into his many treasured books.  John was predeceased by David, his younger OA brother and is greatly missed by his family and friends.

This obituary was written by three OA friends of John, Paul Fessler, Roger Lewis and Peter Lyon