Tag Archives: Peter A Stringer

Long Live Patina! By Peter Stringer

From: STRINGER
Subject: 1943-47

An experience every youth entering a boarding institution carries for life. My entrance to Bishop Cotton Preparatory School, Chota Simla (1943) was alone and with tear filled trepidation. I had never slept in a warm flannel night suit in all of my 10 years. Spellbound and lonely I stood like a statute on the edge of the sports playground gazing with moistened eyes as some bigger boys kicking a football around the goal mouth against the stone wall on the opposite side. It was cold and turning to dusk and, must have been after the awful supper. Hunger soon got me used to the grub another new expression I learnt!!
The passage of time does erode many hapless memories but the outstanding contrast of ones very own investiture as a border is so shocking that it presents remarkable guts; an abiding staunch character for such a school boy. Masters and teachers suddenly and effectively take on a new roll, one of strict parent, or dominating relative or understanding loving guardian. We soon learnt discipline, schooled in manners and rules of the establishment. A remarkable, observation was the few Indian borders of varying beliefs quite readily, without objection, accepted Christian doctrine and the European way of life. Leaving me with an inspiring lesson to coexist from which I have benefited throughout my life. (Having visited the school on some occasions in recent years I have thankfully acknowledged many old tradition still exist; perhaps to a lesser degree, to the school’s credible distinction in modern India.)
Often at evening time, at the very edge of the playing field facing the South Western horizon I would stand with thoughts of home. Sunsets brought on melancholy as I watched some of the most spectacular changes of sky and cloud formation and coloured hues that artists would find divine and difficult to re-produce. Adding to the beautiful panorama the four seasons gave more distinct appeal and richness. Now much later in life each time I have returned to our Dear Patina, I begin to realize how extremely fortunate we pupils were to be given an education in such enchanting surroundings.
My memory has not failed to list all this and starting in Form Lower II, Mr. Fred Brown was class master. We respectfully obeyed and feared him then but I began to love and admire the dear man in later years, finally meeting him in London many, many years later. Sadly now he has joined his Maker. Our House Mistress was Miss Cunningham: over 60 years on and I am still reminded of her sensual good looks and charm.
From the Main School, Headmaster Cannon Sinker’s wife, a very artistic, gentle mild and polite mannered lady would walk up hill to take classes of Scripture and Art. I excelled in both and was among her favourite pupils.
Mrs. Sinker RA. took keen interest in artistic talent and always encouraged me to use mine fully
1945 After the defeat of Germany and ending the war in Europe, I was pleasantly surprised. Now in the main School, sitting in class at my school desk in Form III B, I watched a smartly dressed man in soldier’s uniform march across the First (playground) towards the Administrative Offices. A dark beret covered his head as his shiny boots crunched the gravel, all eyes near the large bay windows turned left to peak. Shortly after the school period bell rang for the morning first break. Before I could leave the classroom I was summoned to the Headmaster’s Lodge. Puzzled as to why? I made my way with mixed alarm, still unaware as to what awaited me. How very strange to meet my brother John, as well stood outside the Headmaster’s study door. Gosh! This must be serious, could we both be in trouble was my initial thought. My mind raced on random in thought as we murmured to each other when suddenly we were ushered in. Helpless with relief, shocked with delight – It was brother Wilfred the smart REME corporal, head beret off sitting in a chair chatting to ‘Bogla’, Mr. Sinker’s nick name. Yes we had won the war and my Big Brother had fought in it and he was safely back, and I was damned proud! We showed him to our dormitories and around the school and introduced him to our chums.
Changes, changes as school life prepared us for what the future would bring. Or as scouts we were taught, “Be prepared, be prepared – Shout, shout Third class, Second class First Class Scout!” “Dib! Dib!” And stories we were told sitting round campfires at Consul Rock above campus among the pines and other boys spending camp life at Taradavi, on the opposite lower mountain range facing the School. Taradavi was a hillside station on the railway line up from the plains. Kalka was the railhead junction where the broad-line rail terminated at the foothills. The winding narrow gauge, steam train then pulled us up to Simla, (the summer capital of the British seat of Indian Government prior to partition).
Archbishop of India, Burma and Ceylon – George Edward Lynch Cotton was the Founder of Bishop Cotton School, Simla East – we were told in 1859. He had served as the promising young master under Doctor Thomas Arnold at Rugby School, (as legend has written in Tom Brown’s Schooldays); later transferred to Marlborough College (Wiltshire). As College Head with distinction he redeemed the neglected near bankrupt Institution. This led to a royal command – Queen Victoria despatched him to India after the Mutiny on a mission of thanksgiving. With money collected from a ceremonial church service in St Pauls Cathedral Calcutta he explored the Simla hills. Aided with a grant from government initially premises were founded on a lower mountain range at Jatogh – 28th July 1859.

We are told as this development gained good recognition the location became inadequate and was moved to its present site at Knollswood hilly spur near the tiny village of Patina, below Simla and Chota-Simla. In keeping with the royal consent, to my knowledge, the Viceroys were automatically patrons of my dear Alma Mater. I witnessed our Speech Days celebrations Chief Guests like Lord Wavell and Louis Mountbattern of Burma as he signed in my autograph book in green ink, and some thief robbed from me.

The full School year lasted nine months, as did other boarding schools scattered along the foothills across the mighty Himalayas from Murree (now Pakistan) in the west to Darjeeling in the east. Our School stands to the south and east of Simla located 31*6’ N latitude and 77*13’ E longitude approximately 7000 feet above sea level and 60 miles by road from Kalka.
The nine months – middle March to middle December was divided into three terms. Opening with the hockey season, followed by cricket and ending with boxing, football and the final year-ending examinations. More meaningful to us younger hungry souls was the December House– treats or as we called them ‘JHUG-DAY CHEWS’ held in our dormitories. Catered and brought in from Simla delicious Indian curries, rices, chapatis and fare. Finally next night senior boys would stage their own productions, in the Irwin Hall. Poetry, songs, plays and short sketches, sometimes ridiculous observations of School life and masters’ eccentric behaviour to a riotous audience. Three more sporting events, due to a shorter duration I cannot remember when they exactly fitted in, were the marathon during the monsoons and the swimming finals as well. I think the athletic Sports Day was held just after the monsoons finished. The Indian Monsoon blown in from the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean usually reached after the middle of June, sometimes late, but never earlier. It started with thunder and flashing lightening of every description drenching the hilly pine-forest ranges till late September and early October.
I also recall our Founder’s Speech Day and Prize Giving fell on the Saturday nearest the 28th July. This was usually well attended by parents and visitors. The chief guest was the incumbent Viceroy or Governor General in this case Mountbatten (1947). After the dignitaries arrived to a formal welcome by the Headmaster, Teaching staff and us boys, they were seated and we were stood in rows placed in front of the main building for the annual School photograph. These heads of government official residence was Viceregal Lodge, Summer Hill across the valley to the west of Simla. Then followed a high tea before we were all ushered into the Irwin Hall. I was also a Treble (terrible) and later an Alto in the School Choir. I missed being with my brother John in the Special Messiah Choir that recorded for All India Radio singing specially Handle’s Alleluia Chorus at Christmas time. Bishop Cotton School was often referred to as Eton of the East, many attributes written in Indian National and International newspapers and magazines.
We have a very proud and unique heritage and have celebrated the 150th Founder’s Year in 2009.
Among the students past were many young princes from the small Indian Principalities, sons of Indian chiefdoms and dignitaries and boys whose fathers served in the armed forces and all other walks of life. We had boys from China, Tibet, Bhutan, Assam and Burma and the Far East and East African Territories and from the British Isles. We had one or two American boys and from France, Italy, Switzerland and Germany. From this august centre came forth some very renowned persona scattered even now all over the globe. Many in the roll of honour gave the ultimate sacrifice in both World Wars.
I was a very average pupil, only remembering a combination of statistics. I failed my Junior Cambridge certificate (’47). Played in the Colts Cricket Team, taking five wickets against Sanawar (’46). DLT! Mr. Thompson was my Housemaster (Lefroy), Coach in cricket and taught us Art and Geography in which I excelled with his encouragement. DLT himself was an Old Cottonian and was Captain of School in 1937. 1947 I had been moved up from Lefroy House B dormitory to A. AC Chopra was my classmate and best friend and he really taught me to play Ping-Pong (table tennis). Practice under his tutorship I competed and was closely defeated against my House Captain Fred Plunkett in house tournament.
ACC’s father was a doctor in Calcutta. Sadly we never got to meet after leaving school. He joined the Indian Navy and became a ship’s Captain and I had heard he met an untimely death on a street in Bombay.
The School followed the same English tradition and about the same period, dividing the pupils into four schoolhouses – RIVAZ (Cambridge blue), Ibbetson (Oxford blue): these two were our School Colours – Lefroy (Leaf green- my house) and Curzon (red). During my years in Main School we had roughly a total of 260 to 280 borders with about 8 to 10 day scholars.
The classes ran from Form lllA&B, 1V Form, Remove, Shell (Junior Cambridge), V Form, V1 Form (Senior Cambridge) Upper V1 (Preparation for college). The school was run by 11 School Prefects (one as School Captain) and helped by senior House Prefects. This was a good sound regime overseer smoothly by the four House Masters and Senior Master and then finally the Headmaster.
Discipline was keenly followed and any misbehaviour was swiftly dealt with in order of seriousness. Minor cases were monitored at house prefect level – punished with writing lines, detention or menial jobs. Fetching balls from the khudside hit or kicked over, cleaning or scrubbing staircases or polishing. Serious cases dealt by School prefect or School Captain, caning on the backside – three, four or six cuts, and oh boy did it hurt! Very serious – House or Senior Master and maybe referred onto the Headmaster, and then you were for the ‘high jumps’.
School Captains were very reasonable fellows. They played a great part in the school function, connecting boys with masters and teachers. During the torrential monsoon rains the weather would sometimes be truly dreadful. We would not see the sun for weeks. Suddenly after a heavy rainstorm the skies would clear and the clouds, white and thick, would fall into the surrounding valleys and we would be treated to a miracle fantasy like sitting on top of the world – cloud nine! This was when a good School Captain exercised good relations and influence with the Headmaster to grant us a sunshine holiday. Gosh a loud cheer of desperate relief would echo round the school and at once energies went into like a domestic overdrive. We would air our bedding and clothes and shoes, cleaning off the mildew and tiding up. Massage our aching leg mussels from practising the marathon or catching up on lost time in class. The evening would soon come and we would be back to normal with Prep after supper and then bed and lights-out at 9pm.
Rouser next morning was at 6:30 herald from the bell-shed; the Guntee-wallah (bell ringer and timekeeper) tapping the thick brass disc about 20” diameter, first rapid and gently slowly increasing the striking louder for a whole near minute with the final few stokes ‘dong-dong! Out of bed and on with the gym kit; a splash of water to wake you up and down for a slice of buttered bread and mug of sweet tea in the dining hall. Run down onto the main Second Flat playing field, sunshine or rain, in line with your housemates.
‘Dunda’ Hawkes our PT Instructor – ex-Sargent-major and over 60years old was a true veteran if ever there was one. Built solid and square and muscles the envy of all us young aspiring hopefuls. He was tough with a heart of gold and a rasping loud voice that took us through our morning exercises. Even on cold winter mornings he would appear, smiling in a singlet-vest and long cream-flannels, with his cane under his left arm and sometimes with his brown terrier dog Sally

Saturdays and Sundays we had no PT. I do recall Saturday morning dormitory inspection. Our beds neat covered with a red blanket and well tucked in. A clean towel stretched covered over the foot end with our toiletries on open display. The bed’s bottom sheet, pillowcase, dirty towel and soil underwear, cotton shirt and short-pants bundled ready for the dhobi (laundry collected from the boxroom) downstairs. The whole School attended daily morning Chapel Service after breakfast was a must. Matins Communion for senior boys, only, on Sunday mornings but Sunday Evening Song was for everyone.
Yes! As the midnight hour approached that fateful August day of the year 1947 when the Imperial Raj was split asunder and the formation of INDIA and PAKISTAN as two independent nations were formed. This indubitably signalled the demise of rule and an end of colonial empire, on which the sun never set, as history had taught us, was now destined to abdicate from all responsible authority.
The School’s thriving great history was dealt a mortal blow. Within a few weeks Boys, Staff and Servants whose family and connection were affiliated to the new found country across the border in the Punjab were separated and sent home- to Pakistan. Each one of us remaining underwent much sadness, for some the grief was greater, to know we were parted from our dearest chums forever. In boyish wonder, question why – completely unaware of the political forces at work, undermining the integral Indian peninsular. Even though now many of us are scattered across the globe today those cherished school days still evoke warmth and friendship, having formed School Association chapters in many countries. How truly amazing through this fraternity I have met six old boys from Pakistan who were removed from BCS, and to this day remain in contact.

Still recalling that favourite prayer as it would begin –
When the shadows lengthen and evening comes, the busy world is hushed, and the fever of life over and our work done

In the late evening of my own life these memories are cherished and are mindful as if of yesterday.
BLESS DEAR PATINA

Peter Stringer

Letters from Gay Niblett and Peter Stringer / OCA UK

Thank you for all your information, keeping us up-to-date with the various Chapters in India. It is good to hear how well they are flourishing, keeping the spirit of BCS burning strong.

I am adding two reports from Peter Stringer, now retired, long-standing Hon. Secretary and myself.

Please keep the information flowing. Both the old and new OCs treasure all the news.

With best regards,
Yours truly
Gay Niblett
Hon. Life President
OCA (UK)

ANNUAL OCA (UK) LUNCH BOMBAY BRASSERIE LONDON 28TH JUNE 2014

On a lovely summers day there was a healthy gathering of OCs, at the Bombay Brasserie, where a spirit of change and renewal filled the air. Chairman Kuljinder Bahia, had prepared a surprise for us all. He had invited one of his old teachers from BCS as a special guest – the diminutive but beautifully spoken Hindi teacher – Mr V S Bhardwaj.

Mr Bhardwaj gave – without notes – an eloquent and emotional speech, which brought tears to the eyes of many of the young – and old OCs. He spoke of his humble beginnings – chiming with India’s new Prime Minister – and his gratitude to BCS for accepting him and teachers and pupils alike – taking him to their hearts. He stressed his pride in being a Member of the BCS teaching staff and his undying loyalty to the School. He then read a letter of greetings from the Headmaster, Mr R C Robinson – who had encouraged him to accept the invitation to be with the OCA (UK).

This was a “first” in the ongoing exchange of pupils and (soon, we hope, Masters) between BCS and Marlborough College. We have had pupils from the two schools visiting their opposite numbers. This visit by a BCS teacher, will, we hope be the precursor to the BCS Headmaster’s visit next year to Marlborough College, where a Memorandum of Agreement will be signed by the two Heads to layout a permanent future plan for the exchange of pupils and teachers between the two schools. A reduction the costs of visas between the two countries would certainly help!

The other surprise, was also a “first” – a short, speech by Peter Stringer – our retired but still very active, Hon. Secretary, who, earlier, with his wife Maggie, had held their last pre-Annual OCA lunch party at their home. We are all going to miss this wonderful informal gathering. However, Sheila Reed, widow of Bob Reed, continues, with the help of her lovely family, to hold her annual luncheon party at her home, at the beginning of May.

Peter Stringer, writes of the many old boys who attended, along with visitors and the joyous spirit of the young boys, who in increasing members, are attending under the encouragement of the new Chairman, and the Committee of Gursant Sandhu, Treasurer Puneet Singh, Vijay Bhailak and old stalwart Raj Lamba. A big thank you as well to all the OCs who travelled from India to attend – wish that, more of us older members could reciprocate! Peter Johans and wife also travelled over from Switzerland!

Best wishes to you all

Gay Niblett
Hon. Life President OCA (UK)

2014 Letter from Peter Stringer

OCA UK Newsletter 2013

Once again our Secretary, Gursant Sandhu requested me to send in an account for his Winter Newsletter. Collecting my thoughts and reminding you the Spirit of BCS still dwells within and my passion continues for dear Patina and the fraternity.

Indubitably we have enjoyed a glorious dryer summer after the previous awfully wet years. Remarkable events and performances scattered over the months of 2013 deserve high recognition in each of our own historic diaries and will long be remembered.

Sovereign Queen Elizabeth gracefully achieved a milestone for Britain’s Monarch of history. Meanwhile OCA (UK) encourages us to attend the Reunion after another successful occasion. Remarkably again the younger OC set outnumbered the old guard register as fewer veterans rally to support our very unique social chapter and may it flourish in the new life. Andy Murray finally captured the British Wimbledon Victory the nation has long waited for. Chris Froome the second Brit to win the French Tour after Bradley Wiggins last year. Winning the Ashes now does make the Aussies look upto us. What better to round off Britain will one day again have a King George, as the media have driven everybody crazy before and after the birth. Bless Him!

Moving on and into the Cottonian circle one must believe and engage the The Association, as we come together in closer fellowship. I have found over the years my contact with OCs here and abroad has brought much joy. Sadness too as OC lives have expended. This year, Des Sardar (R45) in New Delhi and my dear friend Ken Richards (L 38-45) Wiltshire in April. I truly miss the fellow, as our friendship grew after the connection made through Marlborough College. We shared many happy hours here at Fairlands and Ken’s home in Oare. Together we travelled to New Delhi, Chandigarh and upto Simla and returning via Patiala and renewing old acquaintances. Ken kept us entertained, capturing hearts along the way, with endless acting, he truly was a showman singer, charming and delightful character.

Unfortunately I did not attend his funeral and fully respect his family’s reserve of commitment. At the invitation of his wife Nikky, for OCs to come to the Special Tribute Day for Ken and his life, Maggie and I accompanied by John McLaughlin attended. Around 50 relatives and friends gathered at his home on a lovely afternoon, 20 July. We will always remember him.

Johnny McLaughlin (I41-48) who lives in Williamston Michigan was unable to attend the Annual June Reunion. Earlier regrettably Helen his wife fell over and broke her upper right arm. As Helen slowly recuperated and returned from re-hab gave John his chance to fly over. The two weeks break fulfilled a dual purpose. His elder cousin Jack Creswell (BCS Bangalore) and his wife live in Australia and visit their English home each summer. Last year the Creswell’s could not make it. John felt it imperative to meet them and stay with his other cousin Margaret Christie who lives near them. Staying with us for the start, he tells me he did enjoy our undivided company and hospitality. My main concern at the time was the debilitating severe pain in my right hip. Thank you John for your kind consideration and the time we spent gathering old memories. John dropped me a note telling me he was off to Toronto, 28 September. Jerry Godhino was pulling OCs together again, after completing advance studies in financial planning. What news?

Reminding of late OC tributes Sheila Reed faithfully held the family open house meeting for OCs on 4 May, entering the seventh year of Bobby Reed (R41-46) passing. Daughters Caroline and Jancis doing the honours of looking after nine OCs and seven wives. Maggie and I usually stay over from the Saturday. Kindly Sheila drove us over to Sue and Bambi Mujamdar (I56-59) suburb of Birmingham on the Monday for a late lunch on a beautiful summer afternoon. Starting with sipping champagne in the sunshine and dining on good food and wine. Great hosts, another great day!

1 June I attended a Sherwood College Reunion, held in a church hall in East Croydon. Having attended quite a few over the years made familiar acquaintances, our meeting link threads with Indiaaah. Recounting and exchanging the many similar experiences and tales of happier childhood days. Remarkably a much younger ex-scholar expressed his thoughts to me, in words to the effect, life in India during our era must have a wonderful place as he listened to shared memories, how refreshingly true. I must say the Sherwood Reunions are rather informal and really a meaningful mixture of the meeting both in minds and personalities that share in a unique background. A common heritage we cherish with sincerity and admiration for the education we received and the respect we were taught and above all the love our parents gave us. Just to attend this annual event all that is expected is bring a dish of Indian nosh and perhaps a donation gift for the raffle, if you wish to oblige. Believe me the buffet table when laid out (about 20 feet) has a truly delightful choice of mouth watering khana. If you like alcohol, bring your own other refreshment were plenty.
Our Fairlands khana on the lawn was well down on OCs, still did not deter us from the enjoyment of the assembled good company and the weather held out. One must be prepared for the falling numbers. Well She or won’t Maggie support my School chums Whyteleafe meeting new year?

I am still in awe from the morning, many weeks ago I took a call from Napingder Singh (C43-50) in Patiala. Nappy’s grandson who is a student in Sanawar and only 16, had that morning at 4.20am, first of his six accompanying peers to ascend the summit of Mount Everest. Absolute incredible, when as boys, we up in Simla, it was some feat to khud-walk down from school and hike up Taradevi Hill.

I received this years School Pictures Calendar, the month of April printed in bold, Bishop Cotton School Shimla The First School in India to introduce scuba diving. Amazed how outreaching advances schools are progressing and I marvel at youth today, the world at their feet and how swift they are mastering the computer age. IT for me is moving too fast for mu capability as I can just about cope tapping out this letter on my computer.

Nap’s younger brother Joginder Chahal (44-50) and charming wife Dorothy dropped by on the way from an Aunts 99th Birthday celebration to meeting a friend in Hillingdon, middle of August. I listened with interest as Jog (an agnostic) explained involvement in Dorothy’s local church. Telling me the church warden, away on holiday and the lady Vicar, strict on her time limit appearances, why, he unwittingly drafted in, coped with the Church event. My latent answer was that he was a good BCS boy! I also received an e mail message passed to Chris Kishanan (ex La Martinea) from Vivek Bhasin to say his daughter has made him a grandfather. Congratulations and welcome to the special club!

Gay Niblett (R40-47) is cruising the Med after fostering encouraging closer relationship for BCS with Marlborough College. Doctari Allan Bapty (R36-44) keeps contact over the telephone from deep Devon. Arthur Jones (L42-49) has settled into his bungalow after much refurbishment. Vinny Nanda (L58-66) chats with me over the phone and tells me he sometimes meets up with Anil Bhasin (C62-69). I also get a call from Rajah Lamba (L49-59) sometimes and also hear from Paddy Singh (C53-59) in Wiltshire. I often chat with my old school captain Clive Hardie (L40-45) or his charming wife Shirley. John Phillips (C39-44) rings and brings me up to date. Pete Travers calls from Woking to gather news. Another school captain Jal Boga (C45-53) is presently spending a holiday in Karachi from his home in Canada. Albert Morley (I42-47) an old cam padre lives in Western Australia was visiting his sick sister, who lives in Banbury. He stayed with us for a few days. We met up after leaving school in Calcutta. Albert was working for his father, who ran his own water well drilling company. Al persuaded his ole man to take me on as an apprentice. Always very thankful for setting me off on my feet and moving on in the drilling business that started with Albert in East Bengal, on to Bihar, UP the Punjab, Iraq, Iran, Libya and the UK. Thank you Albert as we reminisced of school life and our early working years together, vivid memories that do not fade with age!

The falling leaves tell me 2014 is fast closing in, before closing this epistle let me wish you all A MERRY CHRISTMAS and PROSPEROUS HAPPY NEW YEAR and adding , that whatever is good for you gets better.

Yours fraternally
Peter A Stringer (LEFROY 43 – 47)

OCA UK 2012 get-together Newsletter

HOT PRESS

2012 is moving on, MAY & JUNE have come and gone, but the inclement weather still persists. Reviewing these past two months our Old Cottonian fraternity awoke from winter slumber. Believing in March the unusual warm spell herald an early summer – no – no – no!

Nevertheless, late Bobby Reed’s wife Sheila and family invite to their “afternoon at home” ‘Watchbury Cottage’ in Warwickshire, May 5th brought OCs together – Gay Niblett (R 40-47) Catherine & John Phillips (C 39-44) Arthur Jones (L42-48) Raj Lamba (L 49-59) Susan & Bambi Maljumdar (I 56-59) Joan & Jess Pudwell (C 42-47) Paddy Singh (C 53-59) Jagat Aulakh (R 58-66) Dorothy & Joginder Chahal (C 44-50) Maggie and I.

30th May the Himalayan Hill Schools Reunion at the Clay Oven at Alperton near Wembley a handful of OCs attended this biannual occasion – Allan Bapty (R 36-44) John Stringer (L 42-45) Peter Travers (R 42-45) Gay Niblett (R 40-47) Paddy Singh (C 53-59) Elisabeth & Peter Johans (I 44-48) Maggie and I.

The weeklong Queen’s Diamond Jubilee fulfilled the loyal Royalist dream of splendour. The nation rose to the occasion as we watched on television the mighty flotilla of over a 1000 boats sail with Her Majesty along the Thames. The pageantry continued celebrating with thanks a Royal concert, a very special blessing in St Paul’s Cathedral and then a RAF Fly Past. Deep depression was relieved in spirit as Britain smiled with pride followed another Saturday later at the Trooping of the Colours.

Finally OCs smiled too in JUNE on the last Saturday a wholesome gathering at our annual favourite choice – The Bombay Brasserie. Yes we too can celebrate with tradition and honest pride recalling our school days in dear PATINA nestled among the pines down Knollswood Spur Simla EAST! I pause for thought to remind you of the penultimate meet of a few OCs the Wednesday 27th before, at Fairlands Whyteleafe. Maggie & I host our ‘khana on the lawn’ and thank the heavens the sun did shine. Attended – Peter Travers (R 42-45) three veteran Rivazites arrived in style a chauffer driven black limo – Humayun Khan (40-47) Gay Niblett (40-47) and Deep C Anand (47-51). Elisabeth & Peter Johannes Raj Lamba (L 49-59) late Bobby Reed’s wife Sheila, Gursant Sandhu (our new Secretary) and his charming wife. From LaMartinea – Cris Kishanan, his wife Pat and a lady friend from Switzerland. To complete the list Paddy Singh (C 53-59) keeping Indian time as usual arrived after everyone had left at 7pm. I fussed with drinks and Maggie attended his late khana!

What I must add before this bulletin closes – my heart is filled with gladness to have shared another happy and joyful OCA (UK) Reunion. Then I realize that apart from my immediate family, this probably is an important relationship in my retired life. At that luncheon I found the platform is set for the future and a stronger OCA brotherhood. We have chosen well a young Chairman and Secretary that understand the powerful BCS bond that cuts across the generations for your support. So remember using a Kennedy metaphor “Not what OCA can do for you — but what you can do for OCA”. . Each member is important and support is paramount.

OVERCOME EVIL WITH GOOD and God Bless our UK Association.

Enjoy the coming months; hope to meet some of you this year and meet you all again in 2013.

CHEERS from an old LEFROY boy

Peter A Stringer (L 43-47)

OCA UK committee meeting – Feb 2011

At the request of our new chairman Vivek Bhasin I attended a committee meeting on 12/2/11.  We gathered at the home of Vinod Nanda in Norwood Green, Southall, Middx.

Picture: Left to Right are : Vinod Nanda (L59-68) ~ Sam Grewal ~ John Whitmarsh-Knight  ~ Daljit Singh Jaijee (R47-54) ~ Raj Lamba (L49-59)  ~ Vivek Bhasin (L61-70) ~ Rana Data Singh (L 50s) ~  Gursant Sandhu (New Secretary).
Front : Gursaant Singh (C95-00) ~ Puneet Singh (C91-00, Treasurer).

Reunion Luncheon at the Bombay Brasserie is on 25 June 2011.

Best regards
Peter Stringer