Category Archives: Articles

Message from Peter Stringer / Obituary Ron Plunkett

I would like to take this opportunity to send cordial fraternal good wishes for a happy & successful Reunion OCA Delhi next Saturday.
Would you be kind enough to add my sadness on behalf of OCAUK:
Last evening I received a call from Les Homer (L 43-49) in Bristol to say Ron Plunkett (C 43-50) passed away at 4 o’clock yesterday afternoon in Somerset after a prolonged illness.     
Pauline with love & devotion nursed him through those years.
After leaving school the first time I met Ron again was at attending my first OC Reunion on Oxford Street about 1971. From that meet Ron, Les, Arthur Jones (L 42-48) & I remained in close contact.   Ron joined the Metropolitan Police force and retired as Superintendent & settled into a charming homestead on Porlock Hill Somerset.  Maggie & I and sometimes accompanied by Shirley & Arthur Jones spent many long weekends and on occasion Sylvia & Les Homer would join all of us. Happy Days & us guys recalling school years & tales of India while our wives rehearsed their exchanges. Pauline & Ron attended all the OCA lunches till Ron could no longer travel after moving to resettle in nearby Allicombe. Phone calls, letters & cards replaced contact & our presence.
I can recall the significant return to Patina OCAUK Chairman Dick Bayliss, Ron Plunkett, Arthur Jones & myself made June 1992. DC Anand kindly sponsored & made arrangement with late SM Jain to make our experience an outstanding visit. For all of us an historic moment struck that gave the arrowhead to the Spirit of BCS across the globe.  
We shall miss Ron and send our united condolence to Pauline, son Shaun and daughter Melanie – bless him another Curzonite to be remembered.
Thank you
Peter Stringer (Lefroy 43-47)

Keeping the BCS SPIRIT

Wishing Old Cottonians where ever you are
A VERY HAPPY NEW Year.

Since I discovered OCA (UK) in 1972 I have attended every Annual Reunion under the Chairmanships of Dick Bayliss, Tony Sinha and Gay Niblett, Vivek Bhasin & Kuljinder Bahia.
That is a proud record of an ordinary pupil of Bishop Cotton School in Simla.
Completely unaware of the Association’s existence when I first arrived in England on a cold winter’s afternoon in December 1958 and made my way to the home of a girlfriend from New Delhi, living in Brighton.

My elder Brother John Stringer (L42-45) who many years later followed me to London was employed by a refrigeration service company. After completing his service duties at the then great departmental store of Elyes of Wimbledon he was directed to the manager’s office of Mr. Elye-Dodds. Taken by surprised to find it was no other but Sparrow Dodds (I 40s). ‘Spaggy’ gave my brother information details of the Old Cottonians’ annual reunions organised by Lumboo Woods the legend co-founder of our School’s Association (London Chapter). Unfortunately I have never met Dodds at any reunion.

For me all this discovery has been a profound experience and pleasure. It created outside my family and working life an endearing circle of dear chums brought on from our unique heritage and formal school years. Sorry to recall that my eyes moisten up when rekindling memories of individuals, so many of them that are no longer with us. I will not recall their names – many of them older before I was born and some even far older; a very ‘chota’ youngster, compared to the Bigsters we called the Seniors during my School years.

All a rewarding relationship that has inspired me after taking over hesitantly the reins of the UK Fraternity when Ted Cuzen deposited the books and files of the Association on the table in front of Chairman Dick Bayliss. It was the year after Ted’s retirement, as Head Teacher for a parochial school of Inner London at Clarkenwell. At that Reunion perhaps no more than a dozen OCs and some wives were present over 30 years ago at the public house, The Merlin Caves around the corner from Ted Cuzen’s place of work. It was Dick Bayliss with his gentle manner and direct approach that guided me to the stewardship of Secretary and Treasurer. Luni Dunne, Roy Nissen and Henry Lincoln championed me and I was forced to accept this official undertaking. With my wife Margaret’s help we held it together and Dick the Godfather steering us on. Maggie’s domestic commitments forced her to hand over the Funds & Treasury to veteran Henry Lincoln for awhile. Our numbers kept steady and from nowhere Anil Bhasin (C 62-69) appeared. He at the time owned in family partnership the Green Park Hotel off Piccadilly. With him he ushered in younger OC life & generously offered to stage our future Annual Luncheon in the Green Park Hotel at much reduced cost.

Dick Bayliss and I ceased the opportunity and embraced the influx of younger Indian Old Cottonians. We formed a committee of six in all. Dick, Tony Sinha, Vinod Nanda, Kamal Behal, Tony Verma and yours fraternally!!

By this time OCA India began to take note. Deep C Anand was President elect OCA New Delhi and Surinder Jain his Secretary. OCs late Mudoo McBean and Robert Reed with Arthur Jones (L 42-49) and their wives visited BCS on an organised tour by an old Sanawarian in 1990. Spearheading the welcome Col. Bill Dewan and some other OCs in Simla and New Delhi promoted closer links. DC Anand sent SM Jain to attend our 1991 Reunion at the Green Park Hotel with open invitations and persuade our Chairman and me to come out to India and visit the School. All paid for and settled they flew us out, Ron Plunkett (C 43-50) and Arthur Jones accompanied us, at their own expense – 1992.

It was a poignant visit filled with nostalgia – dear Dick was our treasure (returning 70 years after leaving Patina) and I coming back after 45 years brought a tear to my eyes as I walked across the “First” flat. It was even more emotional when departing back to Delhi and the lump in my throat was staunch. We had presented an English oak Shield (I had designed and carried to Simla) -Dick presented it to further encourage learning; it now features as The Bayliss Challenge Shield.

Setting the trend in motion I have returned with parties to Simla in 1994, ’97 and 2000, with Maggie; 2004 in a smaller party and by myself in 2006.

Finally in 2009 we joined in the eventful Sesquicentennial Founder’s Celebrations. Every visit has been warmer and the response closer, meeting many OCs and making good acquaintances. A chapter of my life has harvested sheer joy and shared with Old Cottonians of all ages and scattered around the globe.

I have personally met the last two and present Headmaster and have tried to offer my support without interference.

At the Reunion Luncheon 2006 members of OCA(UK) in London honoured me handsomely for my diligent tenure as Secretary. The main donation endorsed my own finance and encouragement from Johnny McLaughlin (I 41-48) to visit North America with my Maggie. What an epic adventure! John made all the arrangements – Helen & John met us when we landed at Detroit and welcomed us to their home in Williamston. We four attended a Canadian OCs Reunion in Toronto.

A fleeting stopover at Niagara Falls, before returning south of the border to sleep the night and then John drove us down to New Jersey. Stayed a few days at the home of Gurdip Sidhu (L 48-52) & affectionate wife Jagdish – taking in the sights of New York & Liberty! On to Maryland to meet with, once ex-Treasurer Kamal Behal (I 58-67) and his charming wife Nawel, staying at their home. A whistle-stop-tour of Washington – onto a lunch in Virginia with a few more OCs, followed next day a long drive back to Michigan.

Resting up days for Maggie – two of us flew down to Gracelands. Three day stopover then we flew to LA to join again with Johnny. Staying a few days doing the sights & finally for a Dinner Reunion with OC Californians on Wiltshire Avenue. Up in the air next morning we followed the Rockies to Vancouver. Met with Paul Jones (L 36-46) – spending a few more days & finally to meet at a Lunch Reunion with West Canadian resident OCs. Lucky to meet a Stringer cousin Paul arranged to meet in his penthouse flat. Our return was a long tiresome flight back through Dallas to Michigan. Few more days rest with Helen & John in Williamston – too soon IT was all over & we crossed the Pond for Home.

Old Cottonians have come and found us; we have extensively laboured to locate others. We found some of them and our numbers increased and then we lose some, but life must go on. Through the years we have held Reunions at Steak Houses, Public Houses, The Overseas Club, Veeraswamy Restaurant, The Green Park Hotel, The Cumberland Hotel, The Regent Hotel, The Bombay Palace and the Bombay Brasserie. Year on year the Committee guided by each Chairman has boldly achieved success, the Luncheon better every time. But without doubt Marlborough College, in the name of our Founder, has secured a divine place in our hearts and unforgettable. For me the Commemorative Service in the magnificent College Chapel lifted our hearts and voices to remind us of our dear Holy Trinity Chapel and years at BCS. What a dignified honour to the man George Edward Lynch Cotton after 150 years founding our place of learning.

We pray for the good and future of Bishop Cotton School, Marlborough College and Rugby School the strength in fellowship grows to usefulness to one another.

Grateful thanks to everyone for giving me the honoured privilege & experience

OVERCOME EVIL WITH GOOD

Peter A Stringer (L43-47)

Long Live Patina! By Peter Stringer

From: STRINGER
Subject: 1943-47

An experience every youth entering a boarding institution carries for life. My entrance to Bishop Cotton Preparatory School, Chota Simla (1943) was alone and with tear filled trepidation. I had never slept in a warm flannel night suit in all of my 10 years. Spellbound and lonely I stood like a statute on the edge of the sports playground gazing with moistened eyes as some bigger boys kicking a football around the goal mouth against the stone wall on the opposite side. It was cold and turning to dusk and, must have been after the awful supper. Hunger soon got me used to the grub another new expression I learnt!!
The passage of time does erode many hapless memories but the outstanding contrast of ones very own investiture as a border is so shocking that it presents remarkable guts; an abiding staunch character for such a school boy. Masters and teachers suddenly and effectively take on a new roll, one of strict parent, or dominating relative or understanding loving guardian. We soon learnt discipline, schooled in manners and rules of the establishment. A remarkable, observation was the few Indian borders of varying beliefs quite readily, without objection, accepted Christian doctrine and the European way of life. Leaving me with an inspiring lesson to coexist from which I have benefited throughout my life. (Having visited the school on some occasions in recent years I have thankfully acknowledged many old tradition still exist; perhaps to a lesser degree, to the school’s credible distinction in modern India.)
Often at evening time, at the very edge of the playing field facing the South Western horizon I would stand with thoughts of home. Sunsets brought on melancholy as I watched some of the most spectacular changes of sky and cloud formation and coloured hues that artists would find divine and difficult to re-produce. Adding to the beautiful panorama the four seasons gave more distinct appeal and richness. Now much later in life each time I have returned to our Dear Patina, I begin to realize how extremely fortunate we pupils were to be given an education in such enchanting surroundings.
My memory has not failed to list all this and starting in Form Lower II, Mr. Fred Brown was class master. We respectfully obeyed and feared him then but I began to love and admire the dear man in later years, finally meeting him in London many, many years later. Sadly now he has joined his Maker. Our House Mistress was Miss Cunningham: over 60 years on and I am still reminded of her sensual good looks and charm.
From the Main School, Headmaster Cannon Sinker’s wife, a very artistic, gentle mild and polite mannered lady would walk up hill to take classes of Scripture and Art. I excelled in both and was among her favourite pupils.
Mrs. Sinker RA. took keen interest in artistic talent and always encouraged me to use mine fully
1945 After the defeat of Germany and ending the war in Europe, I was pleasantly surprised. Now in the main School, sitting in class at my school desk in Form III B, I watched a smartly dressed man in soldier’s uniform march across the First (playground) towards the Administrative Offices. A dark beret covered his head as his shiny boots crunched the gravel, all eyes near the large bay windows turned left to peak. Shortly after the school period bell rang for the morning first break. Before I could leave the classroom I was summoned to the Headmaster’s Lodge. Puzzled as to why? I made my way with mixed alarm, still unaware as to what awaited me. How very strange to meet my brother John, as well stood outside the Headmaster’s study door. Gosh! This must be serious, could we both be in trouble was my initial thought. My mind raced on random in thought as we murmured to each other when suddenly we were ushered in. Helpless with relief, shocked with delight – It was brother Wilfred the smart REME corporal, head beret off sitting in a chair chatting to ‘Bogla’, Mr. Sinker’s nick name. Yes we had won the war and my Big Brother had fought in it and he was safely back, and I was damned proud! We showed him to our dormitories and around the school and introduced him to our chums.
Changes, changes as school life prepared us for what the future would bring. Or as scouts we were taught, “Be prepared, be prepared – Shout, shout Third class, Second class First Class Scout!” “Dib! Dib!” And stories we were told sitting round campfires at Consul Rock above campus among the pines and other boys spending camp life at Taradavi, on the opposite lower mountain range facing the School. Taradavi was a hillside station on the railway line up from the plains. Kalka was the railhead junction where the broad-line rail terminated at the foothills. The winding narrow gauge, steam train then pulled us up to Simla, (the summer capital of the British seat of Indian Government prior to partition).
Archbishop of India, Burma and Ceylon – George Edward Lynch Cotton was the Founder of Bishop Cotton School, Simla East – we were told in 1859. He had served as the promising young master under Doctor Thomas Arnold at Rugby School, (as legend has written in Tom Brown’s Schooldays); later transferred to Marlborough College (Wiltshire). As College Head with distinction he redeemed the neglected near bankrupt Institution. This led to a royal command – Queen Victoria despatched him to India after the Mutiny on a mission of thanksgiving. With money collected from a ceremonial church service in St Pauls Cathedral Calcutta he explored the Simla hills. Aided with a grant from government initially premises were founded on a lower mountain range at Jatogh – 28th July 1859.

We are told as this development gained good recognition the location became inadequate and was moved to its present site at Knollswood hilly spur near the tiny village of Patina, below Simla and Chota-Simla. In keeping with the royal consent, to my knowledge, the Viceroys were automatically patrons of my dear Alma Mater. I witnessed our Speech Days celebrations Chief Guests like Lord Wavell and Louis Mountbattern of Burma as he signed in my autograph book in green ink, and some thief robbed from me.

The full School year lasted nine months, as did other boarding schools scattered along the foothills across the mighty Himalayas from Murree (now Pakistan) in the west to Darjeeling in the east. Our School stands to the south and east of Simla located 31*6’ N latitude and 77*13’ E longitude approximately 7000 feet above sea level and 60 miles by road from Kalka.
The nine months – middle March to middle December was divided into three terms. Opening with the hockey season, followed by cricket and ending with boxing, football and the final year-ending examinations. More meaningful to us younger hungry souls was the December House– treats or as we called them ‘JHUG-DAY CHEWS’ held in our dormitories. Catered and brought in from Simla delicious Indian curries, rices, chapatis and fare. Finally next night senior boys would stage their own productions, in the Irwin Hall. Poetry, songs, plays and short sketches, sometimes ridiculous observations of School life and masters’ eccentric behaviour to a riotous audience. Three more sporting events, due to a shorter duration I cannot remember when they exactly fitted in, were the marathon during the monsoons and the swimming finals as well. I think the athletic Sports Day was held just after the monsoons finished. The Indian Monsoon blown in from the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean usually reached after the middle of June, sometimes late, but never earlier. It started with thunder and flashing lightening of every description drenching the hilly pine-forest ranges till late September and early October.
I also recall our Founder’s Speech Day and Prize Giving fell on the Saturday nearest the 28th July. This was usually well attended by parents and visitors. The chief guest was the incumbent Viceroy or Governor General in this case Mountbatten (1947). After the dignitaries arrived to a formal welcome by the Headmaster, Teaching staff and us boys, they were seated and we were stood in rows placed in front of the main building for the annual School photograph. These heads of government official residence was Viceregal Lodge, Summer Hill across the valley to the west of Simla. Then followed a high tea before we were all ushered into the Irwin Hall. I was also a Treble (terrible) and later an Alto in the School Choir. I missed being with my brother John in the Special Messiah Choir that recorded for All India Radio singing specially Handle’s Alleluia Chorus at Christmas time. Bishop Cotton School was often referred to as Eton of the East, many attributes written in Indian National and International newspapers and magazines.
We have a very proud and unique heritage and have celebrated the 150th Founder’s Year in 2009.
Among the students past were many young princes from the small Indian Principalities, sons of Indian chiefdoms and dignitaries and boys whose fathers served in the armed forces and all other walks of life. We had boys from China, Tibet, Bhutan, Assam and Burma and the Far East and East African Territories and from the British Isles. We had one or two American boys and from France, Italy, Switzerland and Germany. From this august centre came forth some very renowned persona scattered even now all over the globe. Many in the roll of honour gave the ultimate sacrifice in both World Wars.
I was a very average pupil, only remembering a combination of statistics. I failed my Junior Cambridge certificate (’47). Played in the Colts Cricket Team, taking five wickets against Sanawar (’46). DLT! Mr. Thompson was my Housemaster (Lefroy), Coach in cricket and taught us Art and Geography in which I excelled with his encouragement. DLT himself was an Old Cottonian and was Captain of School in 1937. 1947 I had been moved up from Lefroy House B dormitory to A. AC Chopra was my classmate and best friend and he really taught me to play Ping-Pong (table tennis). Practice under his tutorship I competed and was closely defeated against my House Captain Fred Plunkett in house tournament.
ACC’s father was a doctor in Calcutta. Sadly we never got to meet after leaving school. He joined the Indian Navy and became a ship’s Captain and I had heard he met an untimely death on a street in Bombay.
The School followed the same English tradition and about the same period, dividing the pupils into four schoolhouses – RIVAZ (Cambridge blue), Ibbetson (Oxford blue): these two were our School Colours – Lefroy (Leaf green- my house) and Curzon (red). During my years in Main School we had roughly a total of 260 to 280 borders with about 8 to 10 day scholars.
The classes ran from Form lllA&B, 1V Form, Remove, Shell (Junior Cambridge), V Form, V1 Form (Senior Cambridge) Upper V1 (Preparation for college). The school was run by 11 School Prefects (one as School Captain) and helped by senior House Prefects. This was a good sound regime overseer smoothly by the four House Masters and Senior Master and then finally the Headmaster.
Discipline was keenly followed and any misbehaviour was swiftly dealt with in order of seriousness. Minor cases were monitored at house prefect level – punished with writing lines, detention or menial jobs. Fetching balls from the khudside hit or kicked over, cleaning or scrubbing staircases or polishing. Serious cases dealt by School prefect or School Captain, caning on the backside – three, four or six cuts, and oh boy did it hurt! Very serious – House or Senior Master and maybe referred onto the Headmaster, and then you were for the ‘high jumps’.
School Captains were very reasonable fellows. They played a great part in the school function, connecting boys with masters and teachers. During the torrential monsoon rains the weather would sometimes be truly dreadful. We would not see the sun for weeks. Suddenly after a heavy rainstorm the skies would clear and the clouds, white and thick, would fall into the surrounding valleys and we would be treated to a miracle fantasy like sitting on top of the world – cloud nine! This was when a good School Captain exercised good relations and influence with the Headmaster to grant us a sunshine holiday. Gosh a loud cheer of desperate relief would echo round the school and at once energies went into like a domestic overdrive. We would air our bedding and clothes and shoes, cleaning off the mildew and tiding up. Massage our aching leg mussels from practising the marathon or catching up on lost time in class. The evening would soon come and we would be back to normal with Prep after supper and then bed and lights-out at 9pm.
Rouser next morning was at 6:30 herald from the bell-shed; the Guntee-wallah (bell ringer and timekeeper) tapping the thick brass disc about 20” diameter, first rapid and gently slowly increasing the striking louder for a whole near minute with the final few stokes ‘dong-dong! Out of bed and on with the gym kit; a splash of water to wake you up and down for a slice of buttered bread and mug of sweet tea in the dining hall. Run down onto the main Second Flat playing field, sunshine or rain, in line with your housemates.
‘Dunda’ Hawkes our PT Instructor – ex-Sargent-major and over 60years old was a true veteran if ever there was one. Built solid and square and muscles the envy of all us young aspiring hopefuls. He was tough with a heart of gold and a rasping loud voice that took us through our morning exercises. Even on cold winter mornings he would appear, smiling in a singlet-vest and long cream-flannels, with his cane under his left arm and sometimes with his brown terrier dog Sally

Saturdays and Sundays we had no PT. I do recall Saturday morning dormitory inspection. Our beds neat covered with a red blanket and well tucked in. A clean towel stretched covered over the foot end with our toiletries on open display. The bed’s bottom sheet, pillowcase, dirty towel and soil underwear, cotton shirt and short-pants bundled ready for the dhobi (laundry collected from the boxroom) downstairs. The whole School attended daily morning Chapel Service after breakfast was a must. Matins Communion for senior boys, only, on Sunday mornings but Sunday Evening Song was for everyone.
Yes! As the midnight hour approached that fateful August day of the year 1947 when the Imperial Raj was split asunder and the formation of INDIA and PAKISTAN as two independent nations were formed. This indubitably signalled the demise of rule and an end of colonial empire, on which the sun never set, as history had taught us, was now destined to abdicate from all responsible authority.
The School’s thriving great history was dealt a mortal blow. Within a few weeks Boys, Staff and Servants whose family and connection were affiliated to the new found country across the border in the Punjab were separated and sent home- to Pakistan. Each one of us remaining underwent much sadness, for some the grief was greater, to know we were parted from our dearest chums forever. In boyish wonder, question why – completely unaware of the political forces at work, undermining the integral Indian peninsular. Even though now many of us are scattered across the globe today those cherished school days still evoke warmth and friendship, having formed School Association chapters in many countries. How truly amazing through this fraternity I have met six old boys from Pakistan who were removed from BCS, and to this day remain in contact.

Still recalling that favourite prayer as it would begin –
When the shadows lengthen and evening comes, the busy world is hushed, and the fever of life over and our work done

In the late evening of my own life these memories are cherished and are mindful as if of yesterday.
BLESS DEAR PATINA

Peter Stringer

Information on past staff and teachers

Gentlemen:

I am writing an article to explore the qualities of outstanding teachers. After much thought and introspection, I decided to use my BCS student experience as a guide for analyzing the qualities of good teachers. Any thoughts you might have on what makes a good teacher would be most welcome—especially if you can draw on your personal experience from your school years.

The purpose of this note is to solicit your help in getting relevant information on the teachers and staff with whom I interacted during my years at BCS from October 1948 till August 1954. Any inputs on my request, including resources that might be able to help, would be much appreciated.

More specifically, the following information will help:

1. The full name of Mr. “Taffy” Jones. The years he worked at BCS—he may have been at BCS at two different times. The classes he taught—I know he was the class master for Upper II. Any biographical information—where he came from, his formal education, … —would be of great help.

2. The full name of Mrs. Nanavati, Matron (Linlithgow)

3. The full name of Miss. Hannah, Matron (Box Room)

4. The classes taught by Mr. and Mrs. Murray and their full names.

5. The classes taught by Mrs. Barker, her full name and that of Mr. Barker (Bursar?)

6. The classes taught by Mrs. Fisher, her full name and that of Mr. Fisher, Headmaster.

7. The classes taught by Mr. & Mrs. Knight (Senior Master) and their full names.

8. The classes taught by Mr. Cuzen (House Master, Lefroy) and his full name.

9. The classes taught by Mr. F.M. Brown (House Master, Ibbetson?) and his full name.

10. The full name of, and classes taught by, Mr. T.P. Paul.

11. The full name of, and classes taught by, Mr. Das Gupta (Art).

Looking forward to your inputs,

And with regards and best wishes,

Sincerely,

Vijay Stokes

Vijay K. Stokes
Rivaz House: 1948-1954

vijay.stokes@gmail.com

Vivek Bhasin writes in

…Amigos, Familia y Hermanos de Bishop Cotton School, Simla y Nuestra Ecclesia…
There are friends,

who you befriend when the shyness overcomes; perhaps you encounter another person who too is shy and as you make that eye contact the vibrational link makes the connection. You slowly shuffle and slide, and approach one another. Standing side by side looking at Samson and Delilah at the National Gallery it is perhaps the best place to meet a shy person to befriend. It’s a quiet zone and all one needs is to appreciate the seductiveness of Delilah with her breast exposed leaving Samson in such a trance and stupor that wine and pleasures of the flesh make him buckle. All it took was for Delilah to shave his seven locks of hair and he was terribly weakened…the Philistines snared him… the powerfulness of the painting, the enormity of the room, the many visitors and yet there was a quiet stillness…Finally the two turned towards each other and stumbling with words, grammar and awkward movements acknowledged each other in whispers…the start of a Beautiful Friendship that never waned but constantly waxed.. Nos somos Amigos*
And there is family.
The young girl the only child in her family has enjoyed her kinder garden years and now steps into skirts, stockings, monk shoes. With her long pony tails she starts another journey of eleven years at a Boarding School. Her Father has chalked her life, her Mother more genteel but knowing there is no option after Oxford or Radcliffe and a MBA from Stockholm Business School she needs to work her way back to the country where the source of the Ganges, the confluence of many rivers, the Kumbh mela, a billion souls, the heat and the dust are part of the corporate world where she would start as an apprentice getting to know the ground reality before final lift off. She will at a certain point of time join as a Director on the Board of her father’s conglomerate, one day becoming the CEO. The relationship of Business may also mean a relationship of Business Matrimony to keep alive the name of her founding Great Great Grand Mother who started it all…from a small postal delivery service as back up to the Post Office, today the business is global and huge jets fly across the heavens their bellies packed with super expensive parcels that are guaranteed to arrive at Tierra Del Fuego, or Hammerfest or Cairn Island or Madagascar. Where at the end of the journey when the Jumbo Jet lands and the concrete runway ends, the lush tropical jungle emerges, her company has trained Chimpanzees to carry small packs on their backs swinging through trees and hopping over rocks in meandering brooks to reach Chieftain Zukalu Madunga; he has heard of Serrano ham from the Iberian Peninsula and is willing to pay by way of the rarest plants that are needed by the Chinese in Beijing. More than just aphrodisiacs but for a reversal of Alzheimer’s. The Young Girl now a Business Woman, a shrewd one at that controls the world of logistics. Alas, she has no real friends, mere acquaintances but sometimes it is family that sets the rules… You cannot breakaway when there is lineage to preserve…Mi familia sacrada**
And then there are You and I. Cottonians who lived, argued, competed, mugged, played, hiked, screamed and formed our cores at this greatest of institutions. Each a steadfast brick that dislodges itself from the main frame work of BCS (just as another younger brick lodges in to keep the institution erect and proud) and goes out into the world, sometimes as far as Quito in Ecuador. To face life’s challenges and duck against pelting rocks, analyzing, thinking intelligently and logically, finally striking back with our motto on our backs ‘Overcome Evil with Good’ knowing all along that a Cottonian will never ever forget his roots, his lineage, his teachers, his bearers and the sacred ground of Bishop Cotton School, up in the Greens of Simla. He will never forget those with him he spend over a decade of his life; how can he forget? It is the connection of souls at Bishop Cotton my true true friends that in many ways leaves everything else truly pedestrian. The Cedars around our school have seen all of us grow from young little men to big little men and men with courage and fortitude. Where ever a Cottonian may be on this planet of ours, he is protected by the School Chapel; wherever he may in the galaxy when departed his soul floats free over the Chapel, his dormitory, the First Flat, the Irwin Hall, The School Gate and then meanders down to Remove-Man does he enjoy the view from the top; his focus is on his School, its periphery, he glides like an albatross. Only we Cottonians can see him up there….
Next time you walk the sacred grounds of Bishop Cotton School, pause on the First Flat and look up towards the Heavens..You will see him! I have…a flutter and a cool rush of mountain air as he glides past and banking heavily stoops low to Salute You.

TRUE COTTONIANS. Mis hermanos de BCS y  Nuestra Ecclesia***
*We are friends.
**My sacred family.
***My Brothers’ at BCS and our Chapel.
Vivek Bhasin

Lefroy 1961-1970

31 August 2016